Website Links

Denner Websites Links

People

French Actor Charles Denner 

German Musician Johann Christoph Denner

German Painter Balthasar Denner 

Bosch Global CEO  Volkmar Denner 

Sarissa Capital Management Alex Denner

Guitarist Michael Denner 

VP Graham Packaging John Denner

John and Kate Denner John and Kate Music

Richard Denner (Poet) Richard Denner 

Jill Denner – Research Scientist  Jill Denner

Diller Odell: Mr John Denner 

Companies

Denner Vineyards – Paso Robles California

Denner Cashmere – London England

Denner Market – Switzerand

John C. Denner – Ontario Canada

The Denner Company – Oklahoma

John Denner

The Official John Denner Website “All Things Denner”

 

The People, Places, and History of All Things Denner 

Read Our Blog

Welcome to The John Denner Blog

Jasmina Denner on Fencing

Jasmina Denner on Fencing

Jasmina Denner On Fencing Jasmina Denner was born and raised in Skopje, North Macedonia before moving to Connecticut in 1990.Tell us about yourself – where did you grow up? How did you get to Greenwich? I was born and raised in Skopje, North Macedonia and moved to the...

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Adi Denner

Adi Denner

Introducing Adi Denner Adi Denner was only 13-years old when the enchanted notes of the opera La Traviata by Verdi stole her heart. She is now a professionally trained opera singer with a specialization in contemporary operas. But having too much creative energy, Adi...

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What is a Hyperlink

In computing, a hyperlink, or simply a link, is a reference to data that the reader can directly follow either by clicking or tapping.[1] A hyperlink points to a whole document or to a specific element within a document. Hypertext is text with hyperlinks. The text that is linked from is called anchor text. A software system that is used for viewing and creating hypertext is a hypertext system, and to create a hyperlink is to hyperlink (or simply to link). A user following hyperlinks is said to navigate or browse the hypertext.

The document containing a hyperlink is known as its source document. For example, in an online reference work such as Wikipedia, or Google, many words and terms in the text are hyperlinked to definitions of those terms. Hyperlinks are often used to implement reference mechanisms such as tables of contents, footnotes, bibliographies, indexes, letters and glossaries.

In some hypertext hyperlinks can be bidirectional: they can be followed in two directions, so both ends act as anchors and as targets. More complex arrangements exist, such as many-to-many links.

The effect of following a hyperlink may vary with the hypertext system and may sometimes depend on the link itself; for instance, on the World Wide Web most hyperlinks cause the target document to replace the document being displayed, but some are marked to cause the target document to open in a new window. Another possibility is transclusion, for which the link target is a document fragment that replaces the link anchor within the source document. Not only persons browsing the document follow hyperlinks. These hyperlinks may also be followed automatically by programs. A program that traverses the hypertext, following each hyperlink and gathering all the retrieved documents is known as a Web spider or crawler.